The pilot makes a good decision and comes back to collect the passengers’ luggage


The Sounds Air flight was 10 minutes away from its trip when the pilot received the message that two bags had been left behind.  (File photo)

Ricky Wilson / Stuff

The Sounds Air flight was 10 minutes away from its trip when the pilot received the message that two bags had been left behind. (File photo)

Sounds Air Flight 906 was minutes from Westport when the pilot received a message they had forgotten something.

While most of the luggage had reached the flight to Wellington, an error meant two bags were left on the carousel, Sounds Air director of operations Jesse Woods said.

“The pilot was five to ten minutes away from the trip when the Westport staff member contacted them,” said Woods.

It was a little before 5 p.m. Wednesday, and there were no more flights that day.

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Chris McKeen / Stuff

Far from it, whānau meets as Auckland’s borders reopen, including ‘super-aunt’ Lucy O’Shea who met her niece Poppy during a touching introduction at the airport.

“So the passenger would have been without their luggage until the next morning,” said Woods.

“As Christmas approaches, people need to be with their things, so the pilot made the decision to turn around and lift those bags.”

Woods said the passenger was grateful for the decision and most passengers understood the 25-minute delay of the 50-minute flight.

Rolling suitcase on a luggage belt at the airport terminal.

123RF

Rolling suitcase on a luggage belt at the airport terminal.

“It’s not ideal, it’s a disadvantage. You can have frustrated passengers, but most understand that it can happen to anyone. It’s the same when a flight is waiting for late passengers – people know they might be the ones delaying the next flight.

The delay was eased slightly by Wellington airport staff who worked quickly to unload the plane to make up for lost time, Woods said.

Woods said the U-turn was a rare event, something that happened a handful of times a year, on thousands of flights.

“There are a lot of moving parts, sometimes things go wrong. Sometimes it’s about putting the bag on the next flight, but when we’ve made a mistake we’ll do everything in our power to rectify it.

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